UK Host with multiple servers – diff A Class IPs

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Old

Today, 05:39 AM





Newbie








 

Join Date: Oct 2013


Posts: 9









Hi guys,

I was hoping you could point me in the direction of a UK hosting company that offers:

– UK Servers

– A range of IPs with different A Class (I realise I will have to take out a number of separate accounts)

– reasonably priced

Thanks or your help!

















Old

Today, 05:40 AM





Junior Guru Wannabe








 

Join Date: Oct 2013

Location: Singapore


Posts: 43









Do you require the host to be UK registered or simply have UK servers?







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Old

Today, 05:42 AM





Newbie








 

Join Date: Oct 2013


Posts: 9







Quote:



Originally Posted by HostWithLove_Cody
View Post

Do you require the host to be UK registered or simply have UK servers?


Just UK Servers – at least three of them to make it worthwhile though…

















Old

Today, 09:45 AM





Web Hosting Master








 

Join Date: Mar 2005

Location: Ten1/0/2


Posts: 1,883







Please read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IP_address – especially where class based addressing was replaced by CIDR in 1993.

Let me break it down for you – quoting another website that explains a concept that was replaced 20 years ago, still does not make it right.

/ reported







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Old

Today, 09:46 AM





Premium Member










 

Join Date: Feb 2006

Location: Kepler 62F


Posts: 10,656







You’re right, it does … in 1992. That’s nothing but historical information.

Everything is CIDR now.

The idea that IPs affect SEO are so 1990s. It doesn’t.

This is 2013.















Last edited by F-DNS; Today at 10:09 AM.
















Old

Today, 10:16 AM





Newbie








 

Join Date: Oct 2013


Posts: 9







OK, so from an SEO perspective, if one wanted to build out a site network, would they not want the first set of numbers in the IPs to be different for each site?

I am confused, then again as RRWH pointed out, hosting really isn’t my forte (hence why I’m here asking noob questions).

Quote:



Originally Posted by kpmedia
View Post

You’re right, it does … in 1992. That’s nothing but historical information.

Everything is CIDR now.

The idea that IPs affect SEO are so 1990s. It doesn’t.

This is 2013.


















Old

Today, 10:22 AM





Web Hosting Master








 

Join Date: Mar 2005

Location: Ten1/0/2


Posts: 1,883







It is time this myth died –

IT HAS NEVER BEEN POSSIBLE TO HOST A WEBSITE ON A DIFFERENT CLASS ( A B OR C ) ADDRESS.

CIDR replaced Class-based routing in the beginning of 1993. The Web browser was created towards the end of 1993.

OP, so please explain to EVERYONE exactly how you could ever do what you wanted to do?







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Last edited by F-DNS; Today at 10:37 AM.
















Old

Today, 10:25 AM





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Join Date: Mar 2005

Location: Ten1/0/2


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Quote:



Originally Posted by marcoose81
View Post

OK, so from an SEO perspective, if one wanted to build out a site network, would they not want the first set of numbers in the IPs to be different for each site?


From an SEO perspective, if you are intent on building a network, you are a Search Engine Spammer.







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Providing Internet Services since 1995 and Hosting Since 2004

















Old

Today, 10:57 AM





Newbie








 

Join Date: Oct 2013


Posts: 9









Thanks for sharing your friendly community with me and good luck to all!

















Old

Today, 11:26 AM





Web Hosting Master








 

Join Date: Oct 2010

Location: Kent


Posts: 2,225







@marcoose81 – I think that, for the way things run today, to get 3 websites onto 3 totally separate networks, you’ll not only need 3 accounts, you’ll need 3 accounts with different hosts.

Let me explain.

These days, hosts / data centres / ISPs are allocated blocks of IP addresses. These blocks don’t always match onto the old class-based description system. Someone who only needs 16 addresses (13 usable ones) would be assigned a /28 block – say from 12.13.14.0 to 12.13.14.15. Someone else, a larger provider, might need 4096 IPs – which would be a /20 – say from 12.13.14.0 to 12.13.15.127.

If you wanted your sites hosted on genuinely different networks (although, I’d join with others in asking why you need this, because it may not have the benefits you’re after), you’d need to have the sites in different of these blocks.

If the blocks were always the same size as the old C-class etc. system, then every provider’s network would either be a /24, a /16 or a /8. But that isn’t the case. So you could be on a different (what used to be called) “B-Class” (now called a /16) and still be on the same network. Cogent, for instance, own the whole of 38.0.0.0/8. Even being on a different (so-called) A-Class is no guarantee.

So what you actually need is not addresses that would be have been referred to as different x-Class, but IPs on different networks – IPs allocated to different providers.

Which is why I say you really need to look at different accounts with different providers. Even then, there’s no guarantee – providers often lease their allocations from their colocation providers. But the converse is guaranteed – as long as the same provider is giving you the different services, you are unlikely to get the degree of separation you’re looking for.







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Old

Today, 11:31 AM





Newbie








 

Join Date: Oct 2013


Posts: 9







+1 Thanks so much for the information. You really explained things well there.

Quote:



Originally Posted by JamesOakley
View Post

@marcoose81 – I think that, for the way things run today, to get 3 websites onto 3 totally separate networks, you’ll not only need 3 accounts, you’ll need 3 accounts with different hosts.

Let me explain.

These days, hosts / data centres / ISPs are allocated blocks of IP addresses. These blocks don’t always match onto the old class-based description system. Someone who only needs 16 addresses (13 usable ones) would be assigned a /28 block – say from 12.13.14.0 to 12.13.14.15. Someone else, a larger provider, might need 4096 IPs – which would be a /20 – say from 12.13.14.0 to 12.13.15.127.

If you wanted your sites hosted on genuinely different networks (although, I’d join with others in asking why you need this, because it may not have the benefits you’re after), you’d need to have the sites in different of these blocks.

If the blocks were always the same size as the old C-class etc. system, then every provider’s network would either be a /24, a /16 or a /8. But that isn’t the case. So you could be on a different (what used to be called) “B-Class” (now called a /16) and still be on the same network. Cogent, for instance, own the whole of 38.0.0.0/8. Even being on a different (so-called) A-Class is no guarantee.

So what you actually need is not addresses that would be have been referred to as different x-Class, but IPs on different networks – IPs allocated to different providers.

Which is why I say you really need to look at different accounts with different providers. Even then, there’s no guarantee – providers often lease their allocations from their colocation providers. But the converse is guaranteed – as long as the same provider is giving you the different services, you are unlikely to get the degree of separation you’re looking for.



















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